A Reproduction Examination

 

TheJesusBlueprintInvesting into others takes time.  It takes energy.  It takes intentionality. It may mean changing an already-set schedule, or doing something in a different way.  Yet, when God chooses to change up our plans and we respond willingly to a new course of action, His purposes can be accomplished. The last thing Jesus commissioned His disciples to do was to reproduce what He’d invested in them into others, who in turn would do the same. That is really what sharing life and faith is really all about. It’s about doing life together.  Is there an exam at the end of life whereby we will be judged for our actions as His followers?  Consider this illustration shared by a dear friend of the PAOC, Dave Buehring…

It’s the first day of class. As students enter the classroom, some are catching up with one another, while others are scurrying about looking for the perfect seat. As the professor moves towards the front of the room, students begin to take their seats. Because this class has never been offered before, everyone is interested in learning more about it.
After welcoming them, the professor dives into a thorough overview of all that will be covered throughout the semester. He provides each person with a handout of his lecture topics, along with what books will be required reading.

To the delight of the entire class, he also communicates in his opening presentation that there will be no pop quizzes, no weekly tests, no research papers, and no mid-term exam! Once the volume of the sudden mass frenzy dies down, he goes on, saying,

 “I want you to get everything you possibly can out of my class, so you must listen very carefully to what I am about to say. To do well, you must attend all of my lectures each week and make sure that you read the books I’ve assigned to you. It is the content contained in these that will be on the final exam on your final day of class. One other thing: I’d like you to find one person outside of this class with whom you’ll share what you’re learning each week. Do these things well, and I can assure you that you’re on your way to receiving a great grade for your work.”

 

Following these words, he dismissed the class—nearly 30 minutes early! Heading out the door, people were heard saying to one another, “What a no-brainer” and “This class will be an easy A”. Others were so overjoyed they were making up lyrics and singing, “Ship’s leaving the harbor…it’s cruising time, it’s party time!”
 
Just as the professor had promised, there were no quizzes, tests, or papers that had to be written throughout that entire semester. Most of the students showed up for his three weekly lectures and, on various levels, digested the assigned reading material.
 
During the last class of each week, as was his habit, the professor led them in a conversational review of the material, answered everyone’s questions, and then summarized the key takeaways for the week. On top of that, he also regularly spent time with students who requested extra help.

Fast forward to the end of the semester.

During the class prior to the day of the final exam, the professor spent the entire hour rehearsing the key takeaways from the previous fifteen weeks while answering questions along the way. In the concluding moments, he then addressed his students:

“It’s been a privilege to teach you this semester. I’ve done everything I can to help you learn this material. Now, remember on our first day together I asked you to find one person outside of this class that you would share what you’re learning with. When you leave here today, please make sure you communicate with that person the time of your final exam so they can be sure to be here. You see, they’ll be taking your final for you and their grade will be your final grade.”

The last words of Jesus in Matthew are:

“All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you. And behold, I am with you always, to the end of the age.” (Matthew 28:18-20)
 
When applying this story to the mandate of Jesus to make disciples, who have you poured into that could take your final exam? And if you could name one or some, have you discipled them deliberately, so that you’d be assured of a passing grade?
 
Obviously, disciple-making is not about “final grades” – but you get the point. The last thing Jesus commissioned His disciples to do was to reproduce what He’d invested in them in others, who in turn would do the same. How are you really doing on this front?
 
This disciple-making assignment was not a last-minute idea thrown in by Jesus at the end of His life. Rather, it was the summation of how He had lived among His disciples for three years. He taught the multitudes, but His primary focus was on investing in twelve. Disciple-making was, is, and will remain His blueprint for changing the world!

Excerpt from Chapter One of The Jesus Blueprint by Dave Buehring. Used by permission.

 

The Jesus Blueprint 
By Dave Buehring
Founder of Lionshare & Facilitator of NetDMC

This resource is available from Wordcom

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